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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
and responsibly. information is still coming in about the events unfolding in japan, but the administration is committed to learning from japan's experience as we work to continue to strengthen america's nuclear industry. >> rose: and then by telephone, ethan brawner of the "new york times" in bahrain. >> it's hard to imagine how they can get back out in the streets quickly. the tanks and the jeeps are out this very important places in great strength. again, on the other hand, bahrain really relies on the financial district and so on to have a normal life, and i think that they're going to have to end the curfew and the marshal law quality at some point. >> rose: we conclude this evening with a look at the continuing crisis in the middle east and north africa with rob malley, john negroponte, and zalmay khalilzad. >> i think what mrs. : clts has done, secretary clinton, has been to hold back on the idea of us stepping forward unilaterally on this but saying, look, if we get the requisite support from the international community, including the arab league, then the predicate has been set for
an impression, barbara, about how news of japan sinks into one of the most seismically active country in the world? it's a good question. a lot of my iranian friends have been very afraid about the brashear. -- brashear reactor. i had one friend tell me it's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's and you have chinese bits, russian bits that they're afraid if you plug it in you're afraid the whole thing's beginning to to blow up anyway. now you have japan. it's a very cautionary tale for the iranians. you notice brashear as that -- has not opened. i would bet that it's going to be a while before that reactor starts up if it ever does and if they don't have a functioning nuclear power plant, why do they need all these lower enriched uniform for? -- uranium for? that's in favor as well as all the other problems that's going on, the assassinations of nuclear scientists and so on. it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slow down. i don't think they're going to give up their determination to have a pro
aspiration of the iranians for a long time. do you had the impression, barbara, how news of japan at that didn't one of the most seismically active countries in the world? >> a lot my iranian friends have been wary of the it bashir reactor opening. the german started in the 1970's, and you have chinese and russians, but if you plug it into the whole thing will blow up anyway. and now you have had japan. it is a very cautionary tale for the iranians. bashir has not opened. there were problems with the fuel rods, some say sabotage of the pumps. i think it will be awhile before the reactor starts up, if it ever does. if they do not have a functioning power plant, what did they mine all of the -- in range all the or uranium for? -- what did dave enrich all of the uranium for? it could be a factor in projecting that they might slow down. i do not think they will give up their determination on those who have a program and to say that they have a right to the program. that as a nationalistic issue. they will not go away. >> that is a lesson not just for iran but for the entire middle eas
blood on his hands. host: thank you. in "usa today" this morning "in japan, nuclear water source is far from clear." host: back to the phones. henderson, kentucky on the line for independents. robert, you are on the "washington journal." caller: good morning. blessed morning to all. host: robert, turn down your television. that will help out a lot. caller: 1 second. i have it right here. host: what do you think about the u.s. involvement and should it involve regime change? caller: as a former moslem, i think it is absolutely disgraceful for the united states of america to be trying to change in regime they are not responsible for. you cannot go around trying to govern the world. the united states is not responsible for the libyan people. they have selected muammar gaddafi as their leader. america has a history of ignoring brutality tyrannical type of behavior around the world. however, when it seems to involve muslims or persons of color, america turns the other cheek. she loves the oil out of libya. she loves to suck the oil out of nigeria. the berlin conference is a historical docume
an argument. >> that's a good point, that's a good point. you have recently come back from a trip to japan. we are now here in washington talking as we tape this. but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas, and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer "because it was a great story," is not enough. why did you make the trip? you have so many responsibilities that come into a decision. why, for example, did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say is a science and a theory. it is not. a lot of it is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i cover that tsunami in indonesia and east asia, but i felt that that was the story that i had to experience tangibly, and to see. as we said, this incredible constellation of the disasters. i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there, and part of being an anchor, as you know, is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. is and it -- isn't it don hewitt who coined this term, "anchor"? a
to make an argument. >> a good point. recently come back from a trip to japan. and we are now here in washington talking as we tape this, but you were there to cover another extraordinary story overseas and you have done a lot of that. what i am trying to understand is, in a way, why did you make that trip? if you answer me, because it was a great story, it is not enough. why do you make the trip? you have seven responsibilities they cut into a decision, because it costs a lot to send you and a lot of people overseas. why did you make the trip to japan? >> i wish i could say it was a science. it's not. a lot of this is i feel impelled to go. it is not just that i covered the tsunami in indonesia and southeast asia, but i felt that that was a story that i had to experience tangibly and to see. and as we said, this incredible constellation of disasters. and i felt at the time, at that moment, too, that there was a reason for the entire broadcast to be there. part of being an anchor is a decision about where are you best there anchoring. isn't it don hewitt and coined the term anchor
places like helmand province, baghdad, those in japan helping the people recover from >> at a town hall meeting earlier today, president obama said that u.s. involvement in libya would be limited in both time and scope. the president will speak to the nation about libya and washington d.c. later today. we will have that live at 7:30 eastern and take your calls. the senate is back from their spring recess this afternoon. members gavel then to talk about a technology bill. more on that tomorrow on the legislation. also, a u.s. district court judicial nomination a vote on the nomination is expected shortly in the senate. in the house returns tomorrow for legislative and business a bill that would temporarily extend the airport programs. the federal aviation commission programs bill. >> tonight, perspectives on the deal between at&t and t-mobile. and from the communications workers of america and consumers union's discuss the impact on the wireless industry, what the deal faces in the justice department and the potential impact on consumers. >> on saturday, the former u.s. ambassador t
of that decade. one thinks of japan where there was no return of growth until the beginning of this decade. how could you possibly attribute to the government as you do? >> i'm grateful for the honorable gentleman's point we have argued consistently and so has the international community that we had a financial crisis from 2008 and 2009. and out of that crisis without making references to tsunamis and earthquakes there are many after-shocks and it takes much time to actually get over that. so i certainly agree with that point. but it was not us who said that we were going to raise growth in last year. it was the conservative government. and the honorable member from chichester when he pointed out that under a labour government we had 40% debt in relation to gross domestic product. my recollection in some years it was 37%. it was the financial crisis that pushed it up to where it was. >> i'm very grateful from my honorable friend giving way. would he also say that's particularly startling after all the motions we've heard from the chancellor and the budget, the growth forecast is actually after
't know. talk to carter center. >> do you have any information to north korea and japan? >> i don't, no. i don't. michelle in the back. then david. >> i have a question about pakistan. in the wake of the ray davis case, as the u.s. been pulling any u.s. personnel out of pakistan? >> no. not -- certainly not i'm aware of it. i don't believe we have. in the days immediately following the resolution of mr. davis' case, we were certainly on a heightened security awareness. but there's been no measures to reduce our footprint in pakistan. in fact, i would say we're getting back to business as usual in terms of cooperating with the pakistani government and the pakistani people in trying to forward our agenda there which is to build pakistani institutions and capacity to bring greater economic prosperity and political freedom there. >> if i could just follow up. there was a report that the pakistani have given the u.s. a list of people that they were going to declare persona grata on the militarying a sis? -- military agencies? >> i'm not aware of that. go ahead. >> are you aware that they have i
about the scintillation at japan's failing to nuclear power plant. live coverage from the senate in the tree committee began said 10:00 a.m. eastern. over on c-span3, us senate hearing on protecting the civil rights of muslim americans. witnesses include an official from the justice the apartment. that also stars at 10:00 a.m. eastern. >> experience american history on c-span3. 48 hours of people events telling the american story. here first-person accounts for people who have shaped modern america on "oral histories." history writers and travel to important battle skills and learn about keep figures and events that should be aired during the 100th the 150th anniversary of the civil war. professor spilled into america's past during lectures and history. join curators and the story behind the scene and museum exhibits on american artifacts. the presidency, focusing on policies and legacies, as told to historic speeches and personal insights from administration officials and experts. american history tv on c-span3, all we can, every weekend. get our complete schedule online and sig
, russia, west europe, and japan and turkey. they preface pages xv to 17 spells out the inputs that the task force had. sometimes brilliant background papers in the end of the report, and particularly one just published on women in afghanistan on the perspective of somebody who was under cover trying to maintain women's schools during taliban rule in their country. with background meetings in a dozen capitols, including a meeting with afghan on all sides from senior officials to the kabul government to the political opposition within that political system to civil society to, yes, persons intimately linked to the insurgency. and we at century, my colleague michael hannah and we provided the kind of support that handwriting what was being told to us by the wisdom of those task force members. they set the course and it's to them that we now turn to outline to you our groups recommendations and findings. so tom? >> thank you very much, jeff, for your very kind introduction and for your setting the stage. i begin by saying the reports findings with the wildly varying were unanimous
. japan. turkey, a special and interesting possibility given its role in the region and its current involvement in afghanistan. perhaps saudi arabia and perhaps others. we are not prescriptive with respect to that. their role would be initially to work closely with the facilitator to help in fact cement ties and bring forward the kind of agreements that are absolutely necessary to see the inner afghan part of the process prosper. the their second role and it will evolve in our view over time to also consult together and negotiate to undertake hollen what with the international community and particularly the region will support what is that the afghans can agree, support what the afghans would like with result -- respect to their future status in the region and the world, is it neutrality or something else? also make commitments themselves on critical questions regarding the future of afghanistan. centrally continued economic assistance and wherever required in the future of the government, security and assistance to help against any of surgeons -- resurgence of al qaeda. as well as
in japan. i have one friend tell me that there's such a hodgepodge of technology. the germans started it in the 1970's. then the japanese took it. they are afraid that if people give in, it will blow up. -- they're afraid that, if you plug it in, it will blow up. some people have suggested there is seven times at the pumps. i think there will be a while because that reactor dissolves if it ever does. if they do not have a power plant, what they need this and richard uranium for? the other things that have gone the assassinations of nuclear scientists as so on, it definitely could be a factor in suggesting that they might slowdown. i do not think that they will give up their determination to have a program meant to say that they have a right to the program. that is a nationalistic issue. that will let go away. >> that is a lesson not just for the iran, but for the entire middle east. >> it could really be a counter- proliferation -- if it is a horrible cause for the japanese, but it is important for all of the the country to want nuclear power. >> with afghanistan being a majority pest
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)

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